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Jan. 26 | Experimental Design Workshop: The Intersectional Nature of Masculinity (Kate Khanna) & Perceptions of Intraracial and Interracial Commonality (Tiffany Huang)

  • 501D Knox Hall | Columbia University 606 West 122nd Street New York, NY, 10027 United States (map)
 Photo from wibailoutpeople.org

Photo from wibailoutpeople.org

Experimental Design Workshop: The Intersectional Nature of Masculinity (Kate Khanna) & Perceptions of Intraracial and Interracial Commonality (Tiffany Huang) 

WHEN: Friday, January 26th, 2018, 12:00 - 2:00 p.m.

WHERE: Knox Hall 501D, 606 W 122nd Street

There will be two presentations for this workshop:

I. The Intersectional Nature of Masculinity: Social Class Threat and the Dynamic Nature of Gender Attitudes

Individuals' status positions, such as social class and gender identity, are negotiated and challenged on a daily basis, and these interactions can alter behavioral responses. Moreover, hierarchical statuses positions interact with one another, and resulting micro-level behaviors can reinforce macro-level attitudes that perpetuate larger systems of inequality. In order to examine the interdependence between men’s self-perceptions of social class status and their gender/masculinity attitudes, I use an experimental design to manipulate class threats and measure their impact on masculinity. In particular, I focus on whether threats to perceived social class lead men to express less supportive attitudes toward gender egalitarianism, and what impact other status positions (e.g. race, income, sexual orientation) have on this mechanism.

Kate Khanna is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. Her research focuses on gender, culture, and social class differences in masculinity.

II. Investigating the Relationship between Perceptions of Intraracial and Interracial Commonality Using Experimental Priming

Although researchers often assume that multiracial coalitions can help racial minority groups attain political and social goals, examples of successful, long-term multiracial coalitions turn out to be rare. Barriers to coalition-building include perceived competition for limited social and political resources, as well as intraracial divisions. Some researchers have posited that pan-ethnic affinity, or a sense of commonality within racial groups, is a prerequisite for harmony between racial groups. On the other hand, others suggest that within-group commonality could exacerbate interracial divisions by reinforcing group boundaries. In response to these conflicting ideas, this project uses an experimental design to assess: 1) whether pan-ethnic commonality within racial categories is indeed a pre-requisite for an increased sense of commonality with other racial minority groups, and 2) how exposure to competition affects these attitudes.

Tiffany J. Huang is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. Her research focuses on intergroup relations and racial inequality.

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This event is free and open to the public. Lunch and light refreshments will be provided. All are welcome!

Through the Experimental Design Workshop, social scientists at Columbia have the opportunity to workshop the design of an experiment they have not yet fielded. Presenters will receive specific, actionable feedback on that design from other workshop participants. For inquires about the Experimental Design Workshop Series, please contact Maria Abascal (mca2113@columbia.edu).

Funding support for the Networks and Time Seminar Series, including the Experimental Design Workshop Series, is provided by the Paul F. Lazarsfeld Lecture Series, administered by INCITE, which features events and programming that embody and honor Lazarsfeld’s commitment to the improvement of methodological approaches that address concerns of vital cultural and social significance.